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Looking For A Toy For Autistic Children?


By Rachel Evans

It can be hard to find toys that children appreciate and parents approve of as well. When it comes to buying for a toy for autistic children, the search for the perfect gift can be even harder. One thing to keep in mind when buying is that most toys have age requirements or guidelines. These are great, but they may not equate with the proper toy for a child with autism. If you have any doubt about age group recommendations and what would not be appropriate, be sure to ask the parents. There are many great toy ideas however, and as long as you keep the child and their stage of development in mind, it shouldn’t be too hard to find something that will be fun and appropriate.

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Before you choose something, there are a few things that you have to keep in mind. By doing so you’ll help the child, but also it will be appreciated by the parents most of all. It is important to remember that some children with autism will rip anything they get their hands on, so you want to buy sturdy items. You might also want to find things that made of only one or two pieces. Some children will scatter things that have a lot of small pieces. As with all children, small parts might be choking hazards, so be mindful of that when you shop for a toy for an autistic child. Again, it depends on the child.

Another thing to remember about autistic children is that they often love to play alone. It will depend on the degree of autism a child has, but many like toys they can use on their own without having to have other players or supervision. Also, some autistic children have a love of repetition. If you can find something that does the same thing over and over again, this might be a great toy for them. Keep colors and textures in mind. Some children love them, and others do not. If you aren’t sure, ask the parents.

Continue reading for more toy suggestions and to sign up for the free autism newsletter below covering all aspects of autism.


For higher functioning autistic children, there are many educational toys that parents and children may love. These toys may tackle things like simple addition or subtraction, spelling, and writing. Not all children will like these, and they may become frustrated with them if they are too advanced. A lot of children with autism love music, and can not get enough of it, so a CD could be a good present. Though this is technically not a toy, it certainly can be a great gift that will be used time and time again.

If you keep the age and developmental level of the child in mind, it won’t be too hard to find a toy for autistic children. However, it is important to remember that no matter how hard you search and how great the toy might be, some will sit unused. This shouldn’t offend you, as it is often impossible to know what a child will love and what they might ignore. The best bet for anyone wanting to buy a toy or a gift is to ask the parents opinion of what works, and what should be avoided.


10 Great Toys For An Autistic Child

About the author - Rachel Evans.


For information and to signup for a Free Newsletter about Autism please visit

The Essential Guide to Autism